Opening Oliver’s toy box, a tribute to the Hamilton couple’s son

But Robbins and Schmidt, and their 13-year-old son Marley, say they wanted to open Oliver’s toy box because it was Oliver’s dream and they would love the store, he said. he declares.

“We were just talking about it yesterday,” Robbins said. “We were at the store and we were talking about how proud he would be if he walked in. I know he would be proud of us just to know that we actually made it.

AML is a rare form of cancer in children. Only about 500 children are diagnosed with blood cancer each year, as it is more common in adults, according to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

The toy store has different types of murals painted on the walls, from Slimer from Ghostbusters to Pennywise from It, and a picture of Oliver is displayed for all to see.

“We just want to do something special,” Robbins said.

Samantha Schmidt and David Robbins opened a toy store in honor of their son, Oliver, 10, who died in October from complications from a bone marrow transplant. He had a form of leukemia and his parents had promised to open a toy store when he was better. Instead, the store was opened in his memory. The store opens on Tuesday, May 3 on what would have been its 11th anniversary. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

Credit: Nick Graham

Samantha Schmidt and David Robbins opened a toy store in honor of their son, Oliver, 10, who died in October from complications from a bone marrow transplant. He had a form of leukemia and his parents had promised to open a toy store when he was better. Instead, the store was opened in his memory. The store opens on Tuesday, May 3 on what would have been its 11th anniversary. NICK GRAHAM/STAFF

Credit: Nick Graham

Credit: Nick Graham

Oliver’s Toy Box will feature many different types of toys, especially vintage toys.

“Oliver was into anything from the ’90s and before, and we built the store around his interests,” Robbins said.

And classic and vintage toy stores are resurfacing.

“These are proven toys,” said Jay Foreman, chief executive of Florida-based company Basic Fun. told the Washington Post. “Parents and grandparents don’t watch Nickelodeon or YouTube to see what’s new. They buy toys they know: Barbie Dreamhouse, Tonka Mighty Dump Trucks.

Comments are closed.